Spilt Milk

the Goodall herdThursday 30th April

A tipping point is invisible. In most situations, everything appears fine until it’s not fine. ~ Unknown.

This week on GC and my site Weekly Prompts, the Wednesday challenge was Tipping Point.  This is my second response to the challenge.

A far-reaching consequence of the UK lockdown has been the effect on the humble dairy cow, and one of the saddest sights for me has been the sight of spilt milk, both here and the US.

Literally a Tipping Point

Milk from dairy farms that normally serve the hospitality industry such as hotels, restaurants, cafes, airlines and cruise ships has been wasted and poured down the drain.

It is estimated that in the UK, around 300 dairy farms which produce around 1 million litres of milk a day are being affected by the ongoing crisis. – The Independent.

Dairy farmers who serve the supermarkets have no such problem, and during the lockdown with so many families staying at home, the demand for milk has increased.

SONY DSC

The doorstep milkman has no such problems either. My doorstep milk is delivered by the farming family whose cows produce it. The farm has had difficulty keeping up with the extra demand and has turned to other dairy farmers to help meet the demand.

(C) SueW-nansfarm.net 2020 Wednesday Challenge Tipping Point from Weekly Prompts.

http://weeklyprompts.com/2020/04/29/wednesday-challenge-tipping-point

18 thoughts on “Spilt Milk

    1. I agree with you, it is such a terrible waste. I can understand why those farms had to do it. If no one collects it and no one else wants it, there’s nothing to be done, it can’t be stored and the cows need milking again! Thank you, Brian 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Murphy's Law

    This is so sad. Here in NY it’s the same thing. Gov. Cuomo is trying to work something out where the upstate dairy farmers, who are barely able to hang on, can get their milk to NYC where there isn’t enough. Obviously there are a lot of politics at play here, and there shouldn’t be. Not now.

    So many industries are already crippled from this pandemic, and it’s unlikely some of them will ever recover. It’s so unfair that the future for some of our neighbors looks so bleak.

    You spoke about your ‘doorstep milkman’. When I was a kid, our milk was delivered to our porch by the milkman. My job was to put the empty, washed bottles in the ‘milk basket’ outside, and then bring in the fresh milk as soon as it was delivered. We knew we were in for a treat when my mother would scoop out the heavy cream from the top of the bottles because that meant she would be making whip cream!!

    I’m glad that your local dairy farmer is able to hold his own, and that he’s reached out to bring others into the loop. One hand washes the other……

    🐾Ginger 🐾

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Our milkman delivers in glass pint bottles, but I recently asked for temporary plastic bottles (pint size) so that I could easily freeze my excess. Victoria now has twice as much delivered since lockdown, but I’m using less each week because I don’t have Joss staying at the weekends or the girls and grandchildren dropping in during the week. I suppose I ought to cancel and order less.

      I agree with you, so many people suffering and for so many reasons. So sad!

      Ginger, I thank you for your comments. 🙂

      Like

    1. Everything is in such a mess, it really is awful.
      It’s so convenient having the milk delivered and it’s only a penny or two dearer than the supermarket.
      Thank you, Sylvia 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The waste of both food and milk is appalling, Sue. The superintendent of our county schools spoke yesterday about why he would not be reopening schools for the last 3 weeks of the year. And not having to order/store food for breakfast and lunch was top of the list. There must be some other way to use this than simply discard it. So many people have been lining up for free food distribution–couldn’t they be given more produce and milk. This is awful.

    Like

    1. You’re right Lois, it is appalling.
      Our doorstep milkman/dairy farmer bottles his own and distributes. But most dairy farms don’t bottle their own milk, they produce it and sell it in bulk and it’s collected in large tankers. When those tankers don’t arrive, the dairy farmers have nowhere to store it because the cows still need to be milked!

      I’m uncertain, but I believe the Milk Board has now stepped in to organise re-distribution on some level, but not sure how much wastage there still is.

      These governors/superintendents don’t do themselves any favours, some just do not know when to say less!

      Our schools are expected to remain closed until September, though they are open for children of key workers such as NHS staff etc. The worry is that maintaining social distancing in a classroom is difficult with young children and often they are the carriers with little or no symptoms.

      Even when our rules are finally relaxed slightly we’re told to expect social distancing to continue for some time to come.

      Thank you, Lois 🙂

      Like

  3. Yes, all of this has been so disheartening. 😦 Especially when so many people are lining up for food for their children.
    The domino effect of the virus and how so many industries have been affected is wild. 😦
    We have restaurants here that are going ahead and getting their usual supply of food and then bagging it up to sell at a VERY LOW price to people who need bags of food…they include lots of fresh produce. I think that has been very nice.
    (((HUGS))) ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Some of the restaurants here have been doing the same thing and volunteers are coming forward to deliver. How wonderful that it can bring out the best in people.
      Thank you, Carolyn 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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